I can remember being drawn to natural science and science in general at an early age. Sure, I was like most kids and watched Tom and Jerry, Bugs Bunny, Today’s Special and many other children’s programming. I think my first *real* exposure to science was from Mr. Rogers Neighborhood, where he would visit other people and their jobs. He taught from the get-go that learning was a good thing and to never be afraid to ask questions. I was always asking questions about how things worked I would say, probably, to everyone’s irritation. I would take electronics, motors and other things apart just to see what made them tick and then put them back together. 

The next show that fed my interest was Mr. Wizards World, also on PBS which taught critical thinking and employed the scientific method into prodding at nature to discover unknowns. Bill Nye the Science Guy fed me even more knowledge about the everyday workings of just about everything soon after.

Sure, all of these kept my interest but nothing made it explode into pure love like Carl Sagan’s PBS series, “Cosmos”. I remember watching it when I was maybe 8 or 9 and just being utterly transfixed at how marvelous of an existence and universe we have. Sagan was one of those people who can take extremely complicated ideas that normally only college seniors may know, and package it into a presentation that anyone or literally any age can understand and comprehend. His passion for things was clearly evident, even to a 9 year old; he made things exciting as well as making further learning desirable. Again, the whole ideology to never be scared to ask questions; every question asked is a yearning to understand our world. Such a thing needs to bed nurtured, not neglected.

As I entered High School I wanted to be a paleontologist (thanks to Michael Crichton’s “Jurassic Park”) and had plans to enter the field. By the time I graduated I held more interest in geology in general and took it up as an undergraduate degree.

I’ve since worked in some geology-related fields and love it. However, I’d truly love to be in an educational field where I can add to the work that Bill Nye, Carl Sagan, Neil deGrasse Tyson and many others put forth in helping the others want to learn more about the world around us.

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