All Blog Posts (94)

Pre-College Education pursued by the NASA Space Grant College Fellowship

Pre-college education efforts are many and varied, involving the teachers, students, parents, museums, and youth groups. However, it is necessary to reach out to school administration at all levels if teachers are to be innovative in their approaches. This introductory meeting clearly indicated that more interaction between the participants would be profitable.

It is clear that the science pipeline leading from kindergarten to college entry needs to be filled with students. What is not… Continue

Added by James Nelson on September 15, 2017 at 6:48am — No Comments

New Book out: Andreas Losch (Ed.), What is Life? On Earth and Beyond

Approaches from the sciences, philosophy and theology, including the emerging field of astrobiology, can provide fresh perspectives to the age-old question 'What is Life?'.
Has the secret of life been unveiled and is it nothing more than physical…
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Added by Andreas Losch on July 4, 2017 at 4:17am — No Comments

Space travel and the Treadmill effect?

I should preface this post by stating that I'm somewhat scientifically illiterate. But I don't want to be!! I have questions. Lots of questions. Maybe even stupid questions...But the kind of stupid questions that only smart people can answer. Well, that's where you come in:





Stupid question #1.



Let's say that I had a spaceship that was capable of speeds faster than the expansion of the universe. A quick Google search says it's 68km/s per megaparsec. And let's say that I…

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Added by Brian Tapia on June 28, 2017 at 3:43pm — No Comments

Is Biological Cell a Machine?

The following is a 600-word essay which I wrote for Physics of life School at National Center for Biological Sciences-TIFR, Bangalore, India. 

           Biological cells, that all living organisms are made of, singly or collectively, are open dissipative machines, in a complicated assemblage of sub-machines in a hierarchical organization of soft matter, which is a perfect system showing emergent properties. They are ever-evolving, self-replicating machines that utilize energy…

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Added by Suraj kumar sahu on May 29, 2017 at 7:00am — No Comments

Explorations of Oxygen-Free Seas on the Oceanus (Part IV: Methane)

WHAT’S UP WITH METHANE IN OMZs?

Guest post by Abbie Johnson

This is the fourth and final blog post of a series.

Here are links to the first, second and…

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Added by Jen Glass on May 21, 2017 at 10:00pm — No Comments

Explorations of Oxygen-Free Seas on the Oceanus (Part III: Nitrogen)

This is the third blog post of a series on Jennifer Glass’ experience at sea.

Read previous posts here and here

“Water, water, everywhere, Nor any drop to drink.”…

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Added by Jen Glass on May 21, 2017 at 2:30pm — No Comments

Explorations of Oxygen-Free Seas on the Oceanus (Part II: Clemens and Claudia)

 This is the second blog post of a series on Jennifer Glass’ experience at sea.

Read the first part here.

 

Six thousand feet below our ship, three tectonic plates are colliding. Like slow-moving conveyor belts, the Rivera and Cocos Plates creep under the North American Plate. Where the denser oceanic plates…

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Added by Jen Glass on May 17, 2017 at 1:00pm — No Comments

Explorations of Oxygen-Free Seas on the Oceanus (Part I)

Greetings from the Pacific Ocean! I am currently at sea for three weeks with an awesome team of astrobiologists, geochemists and molecular biologists. We are floating off the coast of western Mexico, about 100 miles west of Manzanillo, Mexico, on the Oregon State University research vessel Oceanus.

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Added by Jen Glass on May 12, 2017 at 5:00pm — No Comments

New System Removes Micro pollutants from Water

Removing pollutants from water is the ultimate goal of the purification process.

However, current methods of removal have their share of complications. And tend to be quite energy and chemical intensive, especially when it involves removing…

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Added by Alan Banner on May 10, 2017 at 7:00pm — 1 Comment

Sol 92 - The Crew 172 - Final words

SOL 92 [14 January 2017]

Crew 172 is precious for me and will always be. Personally, after living 80 sols with an amazing team, coming back to the hab with a different team was a little challenging. They said they had been following our Mars160 mission but we all were strangers for each other. But I think we all went through the process well because we all had a single goal – a successful mission.  We are the Mars Society Crew. I would say that I see an immense potential in…

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Added by Anushree Srivastava on March 8, 2017 at 6:16am — No Comments

Sol 86: An Unforgettable EVA!

Sol 86 [8 January 2017]

My Sol 86 - “HabCom, HabCom, This is EVA Team… Over” – An unforgettable EVA

It was Sol 86. Actually, for Crew 172, it was Sol 6, but I would call it Sol 86 because for me this mission is an important continuation of Mars160 science operations.

So, we all woke up at 7 am and got ready for the breakfast by 7:30 am. This was going to be a busy Sol for me because at 8:30 am, I was supposed to meet with an Earth-based…

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Added by Anushree Srivastava on March 8, 2017 at 6:00am — No Comments

Sol 92: When you are on Mars… a short note after my 92-sol mission

SOL 92 [14 January 2017]

You are on Mars.

When you are on Mars, life is unpredictable (just like on Earth, but on Mars, it’s a little bit more). I have always written about the beauty of this place; how those small portholes of our Martian cylindrical home let us gaze the surreal red backdrop and make us immerse into our own sense of awe and appreciation. How our home stands tall against all the oddities of Mars. Living in this place, sometimes you feel that you…

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Added by Anushree Srivastava on March 8, 2017 at 6:00am — No Comments

Sol 80: Mars160 Phase One - Final words

Sol 80 [13 December 2016]

Mars 160 mission in the Utah Desert is towards its end. I think we have not just performed a Mars simulation, but lived a life; a life which was entirely different from what we had been living. It is a bonding that we have created with our hab and with each other. We became a family. We had our both funny and stressful moments like all families have, but I think somewhere, we all learned to be unconditional in our…

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Added by Anushree Srivastava on March 8, 2017 at 5:42am — No Comments

Sol 81: I am on Mars, again!

SOL 81 [3 January 2017]

I am on Mars, again! It feels wonderful saying that.

I recently completed the first phase of Mars160 mission. Now, I have joined the Crew 172. For this mission, I am the Executive Officer and Crew Biologist for another 15 sols.

It is my Sol 81. Before coming here as Crew 172, I was asked many times that why do I want to do this rotation when I had already been part of a long-term mission like Mars160. My answer has always…

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Added by Anushree Srivastava on March 8, 2017 at 5:30am — No Comments

Sol 75: EVA Narrative: Canyon, Silence and Us

Sol 75 [8 December 2016]



Yesterday morning, Jon, Annalea, Anastasiya and I headed for another adventurous EVA. This EVA was supposed to be in semi-simulation because the sampling site was 75 km away from our habitat and generally accessible to the public. We started gearing up at 10 am. The EVA team entered into the airlock at 10:30 am and started depressurization. Since we were supposed to travel ~75 km, we took PEV (Pressurised Exploration Vehicle) to get to the location. This…

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Added by Anushree Srivastava on March 8, 2017 at 5:12am — No Comments

SOL 64: Gypsum Astrobiology

Sol 64 [27 November 2016]

On Earth, gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O) is deposited via evaporation of calcium and sulfate-rich water. Gypsum is fragile, mostly translucent and occurs as thick, sedimentary evaporite beds. It is fairly common mineral on Earth and can be found around the salt lakes, hot springs, and veins of sulfate solution. Since it is relatively easily dissolved in the water gypsum is rarely found at the surface except in deserts. In hydrothermal systems, gypsum can…

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Added by Anushree Srivastava on March 8, 2017 at 4:54am — No Comments

Sol 60 - How it all started and lessons learned

SOL 60 [23 November 2016]

What am I doing?! I think I’m trying to record hypolith abundance (Image Credit: Crew Geologist Dr Jon Clarke – and The Mars Society) 

My journey of MDRS started off as a volunteer. In 2014, I joined the MDRS Mission Support as a CapCom and that’s how I first…

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Added by Anushree Srivastava on March 4, 2017 at 6:45am — No Comments

SOL 52 - EVA Narrative: Challenges and Accomplishments

Sol 52 [15 November 2016]



Another intense EVA!



Today, Annalea, Anastasiya and I headed towards the field site at 9:17 in the morning. After gearing up, we went inside the EVA airlock, simulated depressurisation and egressed the hab. Our first task was to remove the two trash bags from the hab. This EVA was basically focused on collecting hypolith abundance data and taking the sample back for macroscopic measurements of hypolith colonies.

The first lesson learned…

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Added by Anushree Srivastava on March 4, 2017 at 6:45am — No Comments

SOL 60: Constraints of Science Operations on Mars: Lessons Extracted while Performing Mars Simulation

Sol 60 [23 November 2016]



We are performing Mars simulation in the Utah Desert and doing rigorous science on field during EVAs. However, sometimes your approaches are constrained in the heavy spacesuit and in absence of highly specialized equipment. That’s what I learned while conducting science operations in this simulation. A proper sample collection regime in sterilized conditions is the first and the most significant step before those samples are processed in the laboratory.…

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Added by Anushree Srivastava on March 4, 2017 at 6:30am — No Comments

Sol 20: Hours spent performing Extra Vehicular Activities so far!

Sol 20 [14 October 2016]

It is Sol 20, and after many strenuous extra-vehicular activities performed by the MARS 160 crew at MDRS, it is worth documenting and acknowledging how many hours the crew spent performing rigorous science and engineering activities. Our Executive Officer Yusuke Murakami did this exemplary job by generating this data for individual crew members. So, in totality, the entire crew spent 152 hours outside the “Martian” vehicle under the scorching…

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Added by Anushree Srivastava on February 27, 2017 at 12:00am — No Comments

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